North Sea, Storm tides

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Summary

The North Sea is a marginal sea of the Atlantic Ocean located between Great Britain, Scandinavia, Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium, and France. An epeiric (or "shelf") sea on the European continental shelf, it connects to the ocean through the English Channel in the south and the Norwegian Sea in the north. It is more than long and wide, with an area of around .

Details

Storm tides threaten, in particular, the coasts of the Netherlands, Belgium, Germany, and Denmark and low lying areas of eastern England particularly around The Wash and Fens.

Storm surges are caused by changes in barometric pressure combined with strong wind created wave action.

The first recorded storm tide flood was the Julianenflut, on 17 February 1164. In its wake the Jadebusen, (a bay on the coast of Germany), began to form.

A storm tide in 1228 is recorded to have killed more than 100,000 people.

In 1362, the Second Marcellus Flood, also known as the Grote Manndränke, hit the entire southern coast of the North Sea. Chronicles of the time again record more than 100,000 deaths as large parts of the coast were lost permanently to the sea, including the now legendary lost city of Rungholt.

In the 20th century, the North Sea flood of 1953 flooded several nations' coasts and cost more than 2,000 lives.

315 citizens of Hamburg died in the North Sea flood of 1962.

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External Links

  • WikipediaEtymology and History of NamesOld map: Manuscript chart of the North Sea, VOC, ca.1690OSPAR Commission HomepageNorth Sea Region Programme 2007–2013

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