Special-purpose districts, Public foundation

From Vototo

Version ID# 1712 by 198.51.100.18
Press the "Improve" button to call for a new round of election and submit a challenging revision.
Jump to: navigation, search

Summary

Special-purpose districts or special district governments in the United States are independent governmental units that exists separately from, and with substantial administrative and fiscal independence from, general purpose local governments such as county, municipal, and township governments. As defined by the U.S. Census Bureau, the term special district governments excludes school districts. In 2007, the U.S. had more than 39,000 special district governments.

Details

Special districts, like all public entities, have public foundation. The landmark case of the U.S. Supreme Court addressing public versus private charters was Dartmouth College v. Woodward in 1819.Newmyer, R. K. John Marshall and heroic age of the Supreme Court. Louisiana State University Press: Baton Rouge, 2001, pp. 244-253. Dartmouth established the fundamental differences between public and private organizations. Critically, a government must be founded by all of the people of a governmental area or by their governental representatives.Allen v. McKean, 1 F. Cas. 489 (1833)Currie, D. P. (1982, Fall). The Constitution in the Supreme Court: State and Congressional powers, 1801-1835. University of Chicago Law Review. 49 U. Chi. L. Rev. 887.

Copyright: Attribute—Share Alike

External Links

  • WikipediaA Citizen's Guide to Special Districts in CaliforniaCalifornia Special Districts AssociationU.S. Census BureauU.S. Census Bureau/Governments Organization/Volume 1Government Accounting Standards Board

Space reserved for Vototo Advertising Program

Content specific ad placement

Voicing the ONLY opinion that counts

System Design by Penpegraphy Tool+Die — Silicon Valley U.S.A.

Reserved for Vototo Advertising Program

(in planning)

Personal tools