Special-purpose districts, State law

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Summary

Special-purpose districts or special district governments in the United States are independent governmental units that exists separately from, and with substantial administrative and fiscal independence from, general purpose local governments such as county, municipal, and township governments. As defined by the U.S. Census Bureau, the term special district governments excludes school districts. In 2007, the U.S. had more than 39,000 special district governments.

Details

Special districts in the United States are founded by some level of government in accordance with state law (either constitutional amendment, general law, or special acts) and exist in all states. Special districts are legally separate entities with at least some corporate powers. Districts are created by legislative action, court action, or public referendum. The procedures for creating a special district may include procedures such as petitions, hearings, voter or landowner approval, or government approval. Tribal governments may create special districts pursuant to state law and may serve on the boards of special districts.

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External Links

  • WikipediaA Citizen's Guide to Special Districts in CaliforniaCalifornia Special Districts AssociationU.S. Census BureauU.S. Census Bureau/Governments Organization/Volume 1Government Accounting Standards Board

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