University of Toledo, Post-war Era and the 1960s (1946–1972)

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Summary

The University of Toledo, commonly referred to as Toledo or UT, is a public research university located in Toledo, Ohio, United States. The university also operates a Health Science campus, also known as the University of Toledo Medical Center, in the West Toledo neighborhood of Toledo; a satellite campus in the Scott Park neighborhood of Toledo; the Center for the Visual Arts is located in downtown Toledo at the Toledo Museum of Art; and a research and education facility, known as the The Lake Erie Center, is at the Maumee Bay State Park.

Details

After the war, the GI Bill of Rights helped veterans pay for college tuition following the war and over 3,000 veterans took advantage of the program at UT. In 1945, the university purchased surplus military housing for the veterans and moved it to campus. The complex, known as "Nashville", transitioned into married student housing until 1974 after the peak of veterans decreased.

In 1947, Wilbur W. White replaced Nash. White proposed a progressive ten-year development plan, but he died in 1950 before the new development was completed. The university, under new president Dr. Asa Knowles, continued White's plan and competed a new men's dormitory in 1952 and the new library in 1953. Educational programming for adult students was expanded and created the Greater Toledo Television Foundation to utilize television for educational purposes.

In 1958, Knowles met with Toledo City Council to secure a new plan for the future financing of the university, during the 1940s the 12 percent of the city's budget was allocated to the university and this percentage proved unsustainable. Council suggested that the university acquire financial assistance from the state of Ohio to relieve the city's financial burden.

Asa Knowles resigned the presidency that same year but William S. Carlson pursued the issue and three bills were introduced into the state legislature in 1959 to propose a student subsidy for the states three largest municipal universities, University of Toledo, along with the University of Akron and University of Cincinnati. The bills stalled but a $2 million levy was passed that same year to help sustain the university. Ohio's three largest municipal universities continued to push for financial assistance from the state and finally succeeded on July 1, 1967. The decision made the university a state university, after operating as a municipal university for over 80 years. In addition to subsidy for students, state support provided capital improvement money for campus building construction, the university changed its name to the University of Toledo.

The 1960s saw an increase of political and social activism on the UT campus. Like many universities, UT campus experienced frequent student protests. Students protested a variety of issues, ranging from a peaceful food riot in 1968 over the quality of food, to protests by students opposing the Vietnam War that lead to several arrests. In 1970, UT students remained peaceful following the Kent State shootings of protesters. UT experienced racial tension when a protest by African American students in May 1970 in response to Jackson State killings temporarily closed University Hall. Again, the UT protest ended peacefully when the university president met with the students.

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